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Meadows gets heated with Ryan on House floor

Tempers are flaring among House Republicans amid tensions over immigration.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump vows to stand with House GOP ‘1,000 percent’ on immigration Heckler yells ‘Mr. President, f— you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol Hoyer: GOP centrists ‘sold out’ Dreamers MORE (R-Wis.) and House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Trump vows to stand with House GOP ‘1,000 percent’ on immigration North Carolina governor recalls National Guard troops from border over family separation MORE (R-N.C.), who is frequently a thorn in the side of leaders, could be seen having a heated discussion on the House floor Wednesday afternoon.

Following the discussion, Meadows threatened to sign a discharge petition backed by Democrats and GOP centrists who had demanded a series of votes on immigration members.

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“It doesn’t matter anymore,” Meadows told Ryan on the floor during the confrontation in comments that could be heard from the press gallery.

The North Carolina Republican then turned to Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Hoyer: GOP centrists ‘sold out’ Dreamers Wall Street Journal warns GOP may lose House and Senate over immigration MORE (R-Fla.) — who introduced a measure that would circumvent leadership and force votes of four immigration proposals and said, “I’ll sign the dang discharge petition. I don’t care anymore.”

Meadows later told reporters that he wasn’t serious about signing the petition, but he did acknowledge his frustrations with GOP leaders.

The Freedom Caucus leader is furious with Ryan because he claims two provisions were left out of a compromise immigration bill that all sides had agreed to include during the negotiations, though Meadows declined to say what those provisions are.

“There were things that were supposed to be in the compromise bill that we had all agreed to,” Meadows told reporters. “I finished reading it today. And I was told there were two things in there that are not in there.”

Meadows said the compromise bill is not ready for “prime time,” adding that he’s working to “get some changes” before Thursday’s vote.

The House is expected to vote on two broad immigration bills on Thursday — a hard-line measure and a compromise bill. GOP leaders are trying to win enough votes to get passage of the compromise measure, but are facing opposition from conservatives.

The bill would end the separation of children from their families at the border, which has sparked a political crisis for the GOP.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE on Wednesday signed an executive order that will end the separations, but he said he still wanted legislation to do so as well. If the House fails to pass its two bills on Thursday, Republicans are likely to be in store for more negative headlines.

White House misspells ‘separation’ on immigration executive order

The White House initially misspelled the word “separation” in the executive order President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE signed on Wednesday to stop his “zero tolerance” policy from dividing families crossing the border illegally. 

The order was titled “Affording Congress an Opportunity to Address Family Separation,” but originally spelled the last word “seperation” — a mistake people quickly seized on. 

After consistently defending the policy that separates families at the U.S.-Mexico border, Trump relented on Wednesday and signed an order that stops the practice. 

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“It is also the policy of this Administration to maintain family unity, including by detaining alien families together where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources,” the statement read.

Trump said there is still zero tolerance for families crossing the border illegally while signing the document. 

“This will solve that problem. At the same time, we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a zero tolerance. We have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally,” Trump said. 

Official Trump White House releases have included misspellings before. In January, the White House misspelled the name of United Kingdom Prime Minister Theresa May multiple times in a memo. 

Trump signs executive order to keep undocumented families together

President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE on Wednesday signed an executive order intended to end family separations at the U.S. southern border, a partial reversal of his hardline stance on illegal immigration.

Trump told reporters in the Oval Office before signing the document that his “zero-tolerance” policy against illegal border crossing will remain in place, but the order will allow children and their parents to remain together while in custody.

“We’re going to have strong, very strong borders, but we’re going to keep the families together,” Trump said. “I didn’t like the sight or the feeling of families being separated.”

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As he signed the order, Trump added: “You’re going to have a lot of happy people.”

Trump was flanked by Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard Pence‘Queer Eye’ star recounts his visit to White House Pence knocks Sherrod Brown in Ohio, boosts Renacci Key conservative presses for shield law after seizure of NYT reporter’s records MORE and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenTrump administration sending babies, children to ‘tender age’ shelters in Texas: report Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations Chanting activists confront DHS secretary during dinner at Mexican restaurant MORE at the Resolute Desk.

The details of the order remain unknown because its text has not yet been released.

–This breaking news report will be updated.

Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending

The Senate on Wednesday narrowly rejected President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE‘s plan to claw back roughly $15 billion in spending approved by Congress earlier this year.

In a 48-50 vote, senators failed to discharge the measure from committee. A majority vote was needed.

GOP Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrFormer Senate intel aide indicted for perjury makes first court appearance The Hill’s Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Washington’s week of ‘we’ll see’ Former Senate Intel aide indicted in DOJ leak case MORE (N.C.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsActress Marcia Gay Harden urges Congress to boost Alzheimer’s funding 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families Trump plan to claw back billion in spending in peril MORE (Maine) joined 48 members of the Democratic caucus in voting against bringing up the bill.

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“My belief … is that it’s the job of Congress to comb through these accounts and that’s what we do on the appropriations committee,” Collins said.

A Burr aide said the North Carolina senator voted “no” on moving forward with the package because he couldn’t get a promise that his amendment addressing cuts to the Land and Water Conservation Fund would receive a vote. 

The vote is a blow to conservatives and the White House, who pushed the package in response to backlash from the GOP base over a mammoth rescissions package passed in March.

White House Budget Chief Mick Mulvaney said the measure’s failure was “disappointing.”

“The American people should be asking their representatives in Washington one simple question: If they cannot pass good-government legislation to recapture unnecessary funds, how can we ever expect them to address Washington’s staggering debt and deficit problem?” Mulvaney said.

But it was also controversial, with Democrats and some Republicans warning it ceded some of Congress’s spending authority to the White House.

Congress had until Friday to pass the rescissions package, which passed the House last week, by a simple majority. Normally, because of Senate rules, spending bills must get 60 votes.

The White House first proposed the rescissions package in May, but revised its request earlier this month. The revised measure dropped the amount of spending expected to be clawed back from roughly $15.4 billion to approximately $14.7 billion.

The revision stripped out provisions targeting federal highway funding after a Government Accountability Office analysis warned it may not legally be eligible for rescissions. A growing Ebola outbreak in Congo also led the White House to remove provisions slashing emergency funds to combat Ebola.

But critics of the plan have seized on the fact that approximately half of the spending, $7 billion, comes from two accounts in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). 

The administration, backed up by an analysis from the Congressional Budget Office, says the rescissions would not impact CHIP spending over the next decade but that’s done little to stem criticism over its inclusion.

Updated at 2:52 p.m.

Melania Trump contacted Secret Service after Peter Fonda tweets

First lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpPoll: Melania Trump approval drops An alternative to Trump’s family separation policy Trump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy MORE’s office contacted the Secret Service after actor Peter Fonda went after her 12-year-old son during an early morning Twitter rant on Wednesday.

Stephanie Grisham, the first lady’s communications director, said in a statement to The Hill that the Secret Service was notified on Wednesday after Fonda tweeted about Barron Trump.

“The tweet is sick and irresponsible,” Grisham said.

The Daily Caller first reported the development. 

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Fonda called for the 12-year-old son of the first lady and President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE to be ripped from Melania’s arms and “put in a cage with pedophiles.”

“WE SHOULD RIP BARRON TRUMP FROM HIS MOTHER’S ARMS AND PUT HIM IN A CAGE WITH PEDOPHILES AND SEE IF MOTHER WILL WILL STAND UP AGAINST THE GIANT ASSHOLE SHE IS MARRIED TO. 90 MILLION PEOPLE IN THE STREETS ON THE SAME WEEKEND IN THE COUNTRY. FUCK,” he wrote on Twitter. 

The tweet has since been deleted. 

Fonda, the “Easy Rider” star and younger brother of actress Jane Fonda, also called for protesters to surround Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents while they’re picking up their children from school.

The actor’s tweets came amid national furor regarding the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy that was enacted earlier this year.

The aggressive measure means thousands of migrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border with their parents are being separated during criminal prosecutions.

Melania Trump has spoken out against the policy through Grisham.

“Mrs. Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform,” Grisham told The Hill on Sunday. “She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart.”

All of the living former first ladies — Rosalynn Carter, Laura Bush, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLewandowski says ‘womp womp’ at story of young girl being separated from mother at border Giuliani: FBI asked me about tease of a ‘surprise’ before election Republicans tear into IG finding on Clinton probe MORE and Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaHeckler yells ‘Mr. President, f— you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol Meghan McCain calls out Ivanka Trump for silence on family separation policy The Hill’s 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump to meet House GOP as backlash to ‘zero tolerance’ policy grows MORE — have spoken out against the Trump administration’s immigration policy.

American Airlines asks government not to use planes to transfer migrant children

American Airlines on Wednesday asked the federal government not to use it to transfer migrant children separated from their families at the United States’ southern border.

In a statement, American said the “zero tolerance” policy currently being implemented at the border “is not at all aligned with” the company’s values.

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“We have therefore requested the federal government to immediately refrain from using American for the purpose of transporting children who have been separated from their families due to the current immigration policy,” the statement read.

“We have no desire to be associated with separating families, or worse, to profit from it. We have every expectation the government will comply with our request and we thank them for doing so.”

American said it is not currently aware of the government using the airline to transfer children who were removed from their families, but it would be “extremely disappointed” if officials were doing so.

The airline’s stance comes as the Trump administration continues to face the fallout from its border policy, which Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMadeleine Albright slams Trump over immigration New Hampshire GOP gov: I won’t send National Guard troops to ‘separate families’ Overnight Defense: States pull National Guard troops over family separation policy | Senators question pick for Afghan commander | US leaves UN Human Rights Council MORE unveiled in April. Sessions had instructed the Justice Department to prioritize the criminal prosecution of individuals attempting to unlawfully cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

That directive has led to the separation of children from their families at the border, with The Associated Press reporting last week that approximately 2,000 children were removed from their families in recent weeks.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle in the House and Senate have condemned the separations and expressed support for legislation that would end them. The lower chamber is slated to take up two pieces of immigration legislation on Thursday.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE, who said Tuesday he supports the House GOP efforts on immigration “1,000 percent,” on Wednesday said he will sign “something” to end the separations.

“I’ll be signing something in a little while that’s going to do that,” the president said at the White House. “I’ll be doing something that’s somewhat preemptive and ultimately will be matched by legislation I’m sure.”