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Democrat Kansas AG Candidate Displays Poster of Wonder Woman Lassoing Cop

The Democrat nominee for Kansas attorney general displays a poster in her law office of Wonder Woman putting a lasso around a police officer’s neck, and, as a result, is facing pressure from her own Party to drop out of the race.

Law enforcement groups criticized the candidate, attorney Sarah Swain, for displaying a poster promoting violence against police officers.

When state Democrats took note of the backlash from law enforcement, they swiftly condemned Swain and tried to distance themselves from her.

“We strongly condemn and reject any depiction of violence against law enforcement, including the image from Swain’s law firm,” the Kansas Democratic Party said in a statement. “We did not recruit or encourage Swain to run for attorney general, nor have we had any contact with her since she filed.”

The state’s Democratic Party added that the poster could disqualify her from running in the attorney general’s race.

Swain apologized for the poster and explained that she had displayed it in her office for years with no intention of offending law enforcement. But the Democratic attorney general defended her decision to display the poster, arguing that Wonder Woman is using her truth lasso to keep police officers honest, and she would do the same if elected attorney general.

“As a criminal defense attorney for nearly 17 years, I have seen firsthand the injustice that can be doled out at the hands of less-than-honest police officers,” Swain said in a statement. “I have been involved in many cases where the truth was ignored and people’s lives were destroyed. These are just some of the experiences that eventually led me to run for attorney general.”

Incumbent Attorney General Derek Schmidt, a Republican, would run uncontested in November if Swain drops out of the race due to pressure.

Trump's Migration E.O: Prosecute Migrants and Challenge 'Flores' Loophole

President Donald Trump’s new Executive Order does not back down on his “zero tolerance” enforcement of border laws, and it directs his lawyers to challenge the 1997 Flores court settlement which forces the Department of Homeland Security to release migrants with children in just 20 days.

The E.O. states:

It is the policy of this Administration to rigorously enforce our immigration laws.  Under our laws, the only legal way for an alien to enter this country is at a designated port of entry at an appropriate time.  When an alien enters or attempts to enter the country anywhere else, that alien has committed at least the crime of improper entry and is subject to a fine or imprisonment under section 1325(a) of title 8, United States Code.  This Administration will initiate proceedings to enforce this and other criminal provisions of the INA until and unless Congress directs otherwise.

That section does not restate the current policy of prosecuting all illegal migrants — “zero tolerance” — but it does not suggest that the government will scale back prosecutions.

As he signed the document, Trump said “we are keeping a very powerful border, and it continues to be a zero tolerance, we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally.”

Trump may not want to put a zero-tolerance policy in an E.O. because that would raise the question of whether officials should separate mothers from infants. There are no confirmed reports that officials are detaining new mothers.

The E.O. says the federal government will try to keep families together while the parents’ cases are completed:

It is also the policy of this Administration to maintain family unity, including by detaining alien families together where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources.

The families will be kept at federal facilities overseen by the Department of Homeland Security, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions will seek the judiciary’s approval to end the 1997 Flores settlement which forces the release of migrants with children:

It is unfortunate that Congress’s failure to act and court orders have put the Administration in the position of separating alien families to effectively enforce the law …

(e)  The Attorney General shall promptly file a request with the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California to modify the Settlement Agreement in Flores v. Sessions, CV 85-4544 (“Flores settlement”), in a manner that would permit the Secretary, under present resource constraints, to detain alien families together throughout the pendency of criminal proceedings for improper entry or any removal or other immigration proceedings.

Here is the full text of the E.O.

Issued on: June 20, 2018

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq., it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1.  Policy.  It is the policy of this Administration to rigorously enforce our immigration laws.  Under our laws, the only legal way for an alien to enter this country is at a designated port of entry at an appropriate time.  When an alien enters or attempts to enter the country anywhere else, that alien has committed at least the crime of improper entry and is subject to a fine or imprisonment under section 1325(a) of title 8, United States Code.  This Administration will initiate proceedings to enforce this and other criminal provisions of the INA until and unless Congress directs otherwise.  It is also the policy of this Administration to maintain family unity, including by detaining alien families together where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources.  It is unfortunate that Congress’s failure to act and court orders have put the Administration in the position of separating alien families to effectively enforce the law.

Sec. 2.  Definitions.  For purposes of this order, the following definitions apply:
(a)  “Alien family” means
(i)  any person not a citizen or national of the United States who has not been admitted into, or is not authorized to enter or remain in, the United States, who entered this country with an alien child or alien children at or between designated ports of entry and who was detained; and
(ii)  that person’s alien child or alien children.
(b)  “Alien child” means any person not a citizen or national of the United States who
(i)    has not been admitted into, or is not authorized to enter or remain in, the United States;
(ii)   is under the age of 18; and
(iii)  has a legal parent-child relationship to an alien who entered the United States with the alien child at or between designated ports of entry and who was detained.

Sec. 3.  Temporary Detention Policy for Families Entering this Country Illegally.  (a)  The Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary), shall, to the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, maintain custody of alien families during the pendency of any criminal improper entry or immigration proceedings involving their members.
(b)  The Secretary shall not, however, detain an alien family together when there is a concern that detention of an alien child with the child’s alien parent would pose a risk to the child’s welfare.
(c)  The Secretary of Defense shall take all legally available measures to provide to the Secretary, upon request, any existing facilities available for the housing and care of alien families, and shall construct such facilities if necessary and consistent with law.  The Secretary, to the extent permitted by law, shall be responsible for reimbursement for the use of these facilities.
(d)  Heads of executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent consistent with law, make available to the Secretary, for the housing and care of alien families pending court proceedings for improper entry, any facilities that are appropriate for such purposes.  The Secretary, to the extent permitted by law, shall be responsible for reimbursement for the use of these facilities.
(e)  The Attorney General shall promptly file a request with the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California to modify the Settlement Agreement in Flores v. Sessions, CV 85-4544 (“Flores settlement”), in a manner that would permit the Secretary, under present resource constraints, to detain alien families together throughout the pendency of criminal proceedings for improper entry or any removal or other immigration proceedings.
Sec. 4.  Prioritization of Immigration Proceedings Involving Alien Families.  The Attorney General shall, to the extent practicable, prioritize the adjudication of cases involving detained families.

Sec. 5.  General Provisions.  (a)  Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii)  the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(b)  This order shall be implemented in a manner consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(c)  This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

DONALD J. TRUMP
THE WHITE HOUSE,
June 20, 2018.

Exclusive — Kellyanne Conway: Trump Has Not Clarified Stance on GOP Immigration Bills Yet 'for a Reason'

White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway would not confirm which of the House’s competing immigration bills President Donald Trump supports during an interview with Breitbart News Deputy Political Editor Amanda House on Capitol Hill Wednesday.

Conway joined Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) for the interview at a House Republican Conference media event on the nation’s opioid epidemic — a crisis intricately tied to the ongoing immigration debate. The House is expected to vote on Thursday on two immigration bills: the so-called “Goodlatte Bill,” introduced by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, and Speaker Paul Ryan’s “compromise” bill.

“The president did not make [it] clear one way or the other yesterday [which bill he supports] — and for a reason,” Conway told House. “Everybody knows where he stands on immigration and he’ll see what they put on his desk, but I think everybody should take great heart in the fact that he showed up to the conference [and] discussed the different bills. I know they were conferencing this morning. This is the way the process should work. I think nobody has been more explicit about immigration reform than the President of the United States, Donald J. Trump.”

“The Democrats only seem to want to talk about the ‘DREAMers’, they only want to talk about DACA,” Conway added. “The president and his allies in Congress have been talking about other measures as well. And the president makes very clear that we’re a sovereign nation that needs physical borders.”

Walden, by contrast, expressed his confidence President Trump supports his favored bill, the more lenient and amnesty-heavy Ryan bill. “Oh yeah [Trump said what he wanted last night]. He did. I was there. A thousand percent. A thousand percent he said. Because our bill — his bill — has the four pillars in it that he’s been after,” Walden told House. “The president’s all in. He said it last night.”

“Well, the president is all in to sign a piece of legislation that gets to his desk that accomplishes his immigration goals,” Conway countered slightly. “And he recognizes as we all do, the legislature makes the laws, and he executes them so we’ll see what arrives.”

Conway thanked House for “talking about fentanyl and heroin and the other drugs and poison that are just pouring over our borders,” drawing the issue back to the conference topic.

“Fentanyl, which is 50 times the potency as heroin, 100 times the potency of morphine, is coming into our communities, poisoning our kids, killing our neighbors and our family members. And we need to be more on top of that … but the president has been giving voice to this for three years now.”

Overshadowing the discussion over the bills is the fury pouring out from the Left over the separate detention of the relatively small number of children apprehended on the border with illegal alien parents who are facing criminal immigration charges.

“Most of these children are being separated not from their families, but by their families. These unaccompanied minors are coming here alone. And that’s not getting enough attention,” Conway said, pointing out the far more common category of children being detained.

“We literally don’t know what happened to the tens of thousands of Central American girls and boys who came here unaccompanied in the summer of 2014 and later,” Conway told House. “If you can tell me with a straight face, as I have challenged everyone in the mainstream media to do — no one’s called me today on it — that you’re comfortable they’re all alive, they’re all with people who love them, they’re safe, they’re healthy, they’re being educated, and not sex trafficked, they’re not dead, they haven’t been raped… people have to go read the stories and not the soundbites.”

Conway also expressed concern over activists openly harassing and threatening figures like Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. “I’m deeply concerned for the safety of folks who, in [Nielsen’s] case she says she’s enforcing the law and doing her job. I wish people would not show up at folks’ houses and harass them thusly.”

Donald Trump Signs Executive Order to Stop Separating Families

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday to halt the practice of separating illegal immigrant families apprehended at the border, despite questions about its constitutionality.

“We’re going to have strong, very strong borders, but we’re going to keep the families together,” Trump told reporters at the White House before signing the order. “I didn’t like the sight or the feeling of families being separated.”

The president said the order was important adding that he, the First Lady, and his daughter Ivanka felt strongly about the issue.

“I think anybody with a heart would feel very strongly about it, we don’t want families separated,” Trump said, and noted that it was an issue of “compassion.

He clarified that the issue of separating families was not a new one, but he would continue tackling the tough issues surrounding immigration.

“At the same time, we are keeping a very powerful border, and it continues to be a zero tolerance, we have zero tolerance for people who enter our country illegally,” Trump said.

Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen joined the president in the Oval Office for the signing ceremony.

Nielsen thanked the president for his leadership on the issue and again demanded Congress to change the loopholes on immigration.

“We ask them to do their jobs, the laws need to be changed,” she said.

Trump said it was tough to watch the children separated from their parents and the troubling images on television.

“You’re going to have a lot of happy people,” Trump said as he signed the executive order.

The order instructs his cabinet members and the Department of Homeland Security to maintain family unity by detaining illegal alien families together and provide or construct adequate facilities to do so.

Three Airlines Oppose Flying Migrants' Kids to Safe Shelters

Three national airlines have announced they do not want to transport migrants’ children from the so-called “cages” in spartan border-facilities to the government’s safe dormitory-like shelters in California, New York, and other states.

The corporate opposition to the federal government’s law-enforcement program was denounced by Tyler Houlton, press secretary for the Department of Homeland Security:

It’s unfortunate that American, United, and Frontier Airlines no longer want to partner with the brave men and women of DHS to protect the traveling public, combat human trafficking, and to swiftly reunite unaccompanied illegal immigrant children with their families.

Despite being provided facts on this issue, these airlines clearly do not understand our immigration laws and the long-standing devastating loopholes that have caused the crisis at our southern border.  Buckling to a false media narrative only exacerbates the problems at our border and puts more children at risk from traffickers.

We wish the airlines would instead choose to be part of the solution. For 15 years, the Department of Homeland Security has worked diligently with America’s airlines to secure aviation and facilitate the travel by air of millions of Americans and visitors and we will continue to do so.”

Federal law requires that the children and youths, from ages around 6 to 17, cannot be kept in federal jails with their parents. So they are flown from temporary facilities on the border to more dorm-like shelters in California and other states, pending the resolution of the legal cases against the adults who brought them into the United States. Once the legal proceedings are completed, the children are released back to their parents.

It is not clear if the airlines will break their government contracts to block the transport of the children, or if they will simply declare their opposition.

Houlton’s statement did not say if the government will cancel its contracts with the airlines if the airlines refuse tickets to the DHS groups.

The corporate boycott began after progressives reacted to an emotional post by a flight attendant:

American Airlines declared:

The family separation process that has been widely publicized is not at all aligned with the values of American Airlines — we bring families together, not apart. American, like many U.S. airlines, provides travel to the federal government through contracts; however, the government does not disclose information about the nature of the flights it takes or the passengers who are traveling. While we have carried refugees for non-profits and the government, many of whom are being reunited with family or friends, we have no knowledge that the federal government has used American to transport children who have been separated from their parents due to the recent immigration policy, but we would be extremely disappointed to learn that is the case.

We have therefore requested the federal government to immediately refrain from using American for the purpose of transporting children who have been separated from their families due to the current immigration policy. We have no desire to be associated with separating families, or worse, to profit from it. We have every expectation the government will comply with our request and we thank them for doing so.

Fake! ABC News Chyron Says Paul Manafort Pleads Guilty to Killing Five

A chyron broadcasted on ABC News Wednesday erroneously said former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort pleaded guilty to five counts of manslaughter.

ABC News was covering President Donald Trump’s remarks on signing a memorandum halting child separation at the U.S.-Mexico border when a chyron appeared that read “Manafort pleads guilty to 5 charges of manslaughter.”

A federal judge last Friday jailed Manafort ahead of his trial, citing recently filed obstruction charges by special counsel prosecutor Andrew Weissman. Robert Mueller indicted the veteran lobbyist in Virginia and Washington on charges ranging from money laundering to tax fraud.

The company tweeted an apology to its viewers and Manafort for the error.

“We regret and apologize for the false lower third graphic that aired during our special report,” ABC News said in a statement. “We are investigating how incorrect information was in our system and how and why it was allowed to air.”

“We apologize to our viewers and to Mr. Manafort. There simply is no excuse for this sort of mistake,” the network added.